Guest author – Liam Livings (and he’s got a cracking giveaway)

It’s always great to have Liam drop by. Having him (or his characters) as a guest isn’t quite as good as sharing a three hour lunch with him at “The Pig in the Wall” but a girl can’t have everything. He let me loose on two of his characters who have been answering the following questions. (Answer the question at the end to be in with a chance of winning a copy of any of Liam’s e-books! Competition stays open until 23rd August, which is when I’ll be back off my hollyers.)

Charlie Cochrane: Today we have Simon and Lucy from Liam Livings’ new story, Wrong Room, Right Guy. What was it like when you walked into that room in the village hall to go to your very first writers group?

Lucy: You wouldn’t believe what it took to get him to actually take that first step.

Simon: how dare you. I’m not that bad.

Lucy: how about three months of nagging and poking you. How’s that?

Simon: in fairness, she is right. It did take me a while to actually, you know get my arse in gear and go to the group. See, I’d been reading about them online and talking to Lucy about it in our lunch break at the school.

Lucy: it was all he ever talked about. Between complaining about the school pupils and teaching and the headmaster, that is.

Simon: so unfair. I don’t accept that one bit.

Lucy: I remember you going on about how you didn’t think you were good enough to attend, and what if you couldn’t write, and what if what you wrote wasn’t any good and and and…

Simon: in fairness, she’s right. I was wracked with nerves. Wracked, I tell you. Absolutely a bag of nerves.

Lucy: still, all’s well that ends well. There is a wonderful happy ever after, and that’s not a spoiler.

Simon: well, it wasn’t quite that simple. But I won’t say too much, because, spoilers… All I’ll say is the path to true love doesn’t always run smoothly. I’m quite proud of that. I should put that in one of my books.

Lucy: *rolls eyes* yes there were a few bits when I was worried about you. Didn’t think you’d come back from the brink, but as you say, no more, because, spoilers…

Charlie Cochrane: *blows referee’s whistle* OK, what was it like, Simon once you had attended your first writing group?

Simon: it was like coming home. It was like I’d found my people. It was marvellous. Of course, I also had to do the writing too. I realised it’s not good enough to simply talk about writing a novel. One does, essentially have to spend time in front of the laptop, with fingers on keyboard, writing.

Charlie Cochrane: Yes, I do find that is the best way to write a book! I also find it helpful to have no idea of the plot in advance but Liam doesn’t approve of that so don’t tell him. What can you tell me about Clara-Bell, the chair of the writers group?

Lucy: Sorry to interrupt, but don’t you think you should ask him about the mistake, the misunderstanding, the lies. All that good stuff.

Charlie Cochrane: you don’t hold back do you?

Lucy: *shakes head, flutters eyes*

Charlie Cochrane: So, Simon, I understand there was a bit of a mistake that started this whole chain of events in your life. To what extent did this mistake lead you to begin the lies, I’ve also been told about?

Simon: I suppose the first misunderstanding was me walking into the wrong room at the village hall. I accidental walked into a Cocaine Anonymous group rather than the writers group which was meeting next door.

Charlie Cochrane: Could you tell us a bit more about the lies? Are you a person who normally lies?

Simon: maybe Lucy is better placed to respond to that.

Lucy: I think lie is a very strong word. I think Simon has a tendency to want to not upset people, so sometimes he doesn’t quite tell the truth. If that’s a lie, that’s a lie, but I’m a bit more flexible with my definition of a lie.

Charlie Cochrane: *peers over her glasses at Lucy* Sounds like a lie to me. Simon, anything from you on this delicate matter?

Simon: I agree with Lucy. I’m not a malicious lie-teller. I tend to sugar coat or hide the truth. Like how I felt about working at the school for instance. No way I could tell the Headmaster how I really felt, so I sort of sugar coated it. And the thing about one lie is it often leads to another lie, which often then leads to a third, much larger lie. And before you know it, you’re carrying around these big whoppers with you, having to remember what you told people, and pretending to be someone you’re not. And that’s when it can all come crashing down around my, err, I mean your ears.

Lucy: *puts hand on Simon’s arm* And you’re not the only one are you?

Simon: yes, quite, Clara-Bell isn’t exactly blameless in the sugar coating and hiding the truth department either. But any more of that’s not to be shared, because, spoilers.

Charlie Cochrane: well, I’m sorry but that’s all we have time for. Thank you Simon and Lucy, for coming to play.

Competition: If you’d like a chance to win an ebook copy of any one of Liam’s published books, please respond in the comments to this question. “Lies, always a bad thing, discuss?”

wrong room poss

Wrong Room, Right Guy
Simon’s the wrong man in the wrong place; trying to teach English to kids who couldn’t care less, he’d really rather be a writer – but it’s only when his best friend bullies him into it that he takes the plunge and joins his local creative writing group. Even then things don’t quite work out the way he planned; blundering into the wrong room at the Village Hall he encounters a group of recovering cocaine addicts and he wants to know more … which is the start, for Simon, of a double life and a whole new secret identity, not to mention an intriguing relationship …

Buy it here, there and everywhere!

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